A criminal defence lawyer who witnessed two police officers arrest and Taser a mentally ill man appealed the matter before the Law Enforcement Review Board Thursday, alleging police did not do their due diligence investigating the incident.

On Dec. 23, 2011, Tom Engel and his daughter Kate saw two police officers talking to a man across the street. The pair decided to watch.

They allege they saw the police search the man without reading him his rights, swear at him and then Taser him.

Engel wrote in his witness statement that he did not see the man resist physically or act aggressively and heard him cry out in agony only after he was Tasered.

Engel complained, alleging the officers used unlawful or excessive use of authority, neglect of duty and discreditable conduct.

The acting chief, Brian Simpson, decided not to go ahead with a disciplinary hearing since he said the man threatened the officers with a broken glass bottle. Neither Engel nor his daughter witnessed that.

Engel claims there was “a bias and also a reluctance to conduct a full investigation.”

Rather than moving into the country’s presidential palace, his home is still the ramshackle one-bedroom farmhouse he’s shared with his wife for the past 30 years. But his views on world affairs are anything but understated… he’s legalised gay marriage, abortion and marijuana, and courted controversy by agreeing with Barack Obama to accept prisoners from Guantanamo Bay.

"They pushed their way in," she said. "One cop … pinned me down on the floor with my arms behind my back and had his knee in my back."

The other officer continued into the house.

"He came in the hallway and my mom was coming from the bedroom, and that other cop elbowed my mom in the face and had her pinned against the wall."

Margo Edjericon says her mother, Loretta Edjericon suffered two black eyes, facial swelling and bruising to her arm. They’re waiting for test results to find out if she also suffered a concussion and broken nose.

A retired judge from British Columbia aimed strong words at Saskatchewan judges for failing to follow the direction of the Supreme Court of Canada in dealing with aboriginal offenders.

Judge Cunliff Barnett said judges in this province are often “reluctant” to acknowledge the decisions of the Supreme Court in the Gladue and Ipeelee cases, which directed judges to consider the historical and personal circumstances of aboriginal offenders during sentencing and bail hearings. “I really think the judiciary in Saskatchewan has been really slow to educate itself,” Barnett said in an interview. “I do think judges in Saskatchewan have been reluctant, and I think it’s past time for the judges to do some learning.”

The tragic colonial history in Saskatchewan “was not taught to persons who are now judges,” Barnett said. He gave a brief overview to the lawyers at the conference - from the introduced diseases that depopulated indigenous societies, to the policies that starved aboriginals on to Indian reservations, to the unhonoured treaties as white settlers “poured onto” the Prairies, to the restrictive rules that tied First Nations to their reserves, to the residential school system.

“The ‘settling’ of Canada by white peoples wrecked traditional aboriginal societies. The well-being of aboriginal peoples suffered terribly and the oft-expressed notion that they should ‘just get over it’ is both foolish and cruel,” Barnett said.

Unlocking the Truth - these kids are 12 years old

Former PMs Joe ​Clark and Paul Martin, former Assembly of First Nations National Chief Ovide Mercredi, former Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami leader Mary Simon, former N.W.T. premier Stephen Kakfwi, Métis writer Chelsea Vowel and former auditor general of Canada Sheila Fraser for an alliance to conduct a “national dialogue” to help “rebuild trust” and “mend a broken relationship”.

Over the past month, Justice Minister Peter MacKay has been not-so-quietly crisscrossing the country, holding closed-door confabs with what his department describes as “criminal justice system stakeholders.”

Although the details of those discussions are in camera, and thus off the record, it’s clear from the accompanying press releases that one of the key items on the agenda has been C-36, MacKay’s legislative bid to rewrite Canada’s prostitution laws in the wake of last year’s Supreme Court decision.
…..

america-wakiewakie:

A Palestinian stands defiant in his village of Kufr Qaddum, whose land is being stolen for the building of illegal Israeli settlements.(Photo Credit: Nedal Eshtayah /APA) (Source: Palestinian Solidarity Campaign UK)

america-wakiewakie:

A Palestinian stands defiant in his village of Kufr Qaddum, whose land is being stolen for the building of illegal Israeli settlements.

(Photo Credit: Nedal Eshtayah /APA) (Source: Palestinian Solidarity Campaign UK)

Loading

Loading

Close
×

Loading

Loading

Close
×

Well this is a bit embarrassing

It appears that the requested content could not load or is not available anymore, however there's plenty more cool stuff to be found on our home page.

Close
×

Loading

Loading

Please wait while we load your content

Close
×